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Egmont Key

Egmont Key is another beautiful island in the Gulf of Mexico and Anna Maria Island’s neighbor to the North. Situated at the mouth of Tampa Bay the key is close to the Tampa Port Shipping Channel. For over 70 years, Egmont Key has been the location of a pilot station serving ship traffic into and out of the port of Tampa. It can only be reached by boat or ferry. There are several private charter and snorkeling tours offered as well as the Egmont Ferry.

History of Egmont Key

Earl of Egmont

The island comes with a lot of history given the back and forth of ownership over Florida. It was first surveyed by Spanish explorers in 1757. However, Spain had given up Florida to the British in 1763 in the first Treaty of Paris at the end of the French and Indian War. The island was named by Britain after John Perceval, the 2. Earl of Egmont. He was a British politician, political pamphleteer, and genealogist who served as First Lord of the Admiralty.

Britain divided the territory into East Florida and West Florida and the 2 Floridas remained loyal to the crown throughout the American Revolutionary War. Spain participated in this war as an ally of France.  In 1783, the Treaty of Paris ended the Revolutionary War and returned all of Florida back to Spanish control. The United States Army started leading increasingly frequent incursions into Spanish territory. Over time Florida had become a burden to Spain, which could not afford to send settlers or garrisons. Madrid therefore decided to cede the territory to the United States through the Florida Purchase Treaty, which took effect in 1821. Florida become a US territory.

 

In 1847, concerns with hazardous navigation at the mouth of Tampa Bay led to the construction of the first lighthouse.  A severe hurricane, also called The Great Gale of 1848, made landfall in the Tampa Bay area and swamped the island. The lighthouse was mostly destroyed. The lighthouse keeper was able to save himself in a rowboat tied to a palm tree. He resigned after the storm had passed. In 1858, the lighthouse was replaced. It is still in operation and maintained by the U.S. Coast Guard as a navigation aid.

Egmont Key also played a part at the end of the Third Seminole War. The US Army used it to detain Seminole prisoners. During the Civil War the island was occupied by Confederate and Union Troops. Defense considerations during the Spanish–American War led to the construction of Fort Dade on Egmont Key in 1899.  The Fort was completed in 1906 and the island remained a military reservation for years. Egmont Key had been the property of the U.S. Department of Defense until 1974. The U.S. Department of the Interior, specifically the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service took over.

Egmont Key Wildlife Refuge and State Park

Since 1978 the 1.6 mile long key is on the National Register of Historic Places. It was turned over to the State of Florida in 1989 and became a state park. The entire 328 acres of Egmont Key are protected by state and federal laws. The Egmont Key National Wildlife Refuge is located at the South end of island.  It is a nesting ground for shorebirds and sea turtles. There is also the gopher tortoise preserve. The Egmont Key Lighthouse and the ruins of Fort Dade are part of the park area of the island. The lighthouse is the oldest structure in the Tampa Bay area and about 87 ft high. It is not open for visitors but there is a small museum next to it. The State Park is open 365 days from 8 am to sunset. Activities consists of touring the historic sites and trails, enjoy swimming, shelling, fishing, wildlife viewing, and picnicking.

Renourishment Project

In order to protect what is left of the Fort Egmont Key’s beaches are in need of renourishment. A $10 million dredging project is slated to begin this December 2018. It is scheduled to be complete in about 5 months in time for turtle season. The sand will not be the high-quality white beach that is used for renourishment of Anna Maria Island but sand dredged from the Tampa Harbor Egmont and Mullet Key channel cuts. The sand will be placed in the middle of the West side of the island that faces the Gulf of Mexico.

 

 

 

If you like more information on day trips or other activities while spending time on Anna Maria Island please contact Team Duncan. We can be reached at 941 779 0304 or send us a quick message.

 

 

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Anna Maria Island Red Tide Fundraiser

A picture perfect sunset accompanied the diners at the Anna Maria Island Red Tide Fundraiser in response to the recent algae outbreak. 160 guests enjoyed the long table 5 course dinner sitting right on the beach in front of the SandBar restaurant on August 26, 2018. The event raised money to benefit START (Solutions To Avoid Red Tide) – an organization dedicated to Red Tide research. It was also helping bringing awareness to island businesses that are hit very hard by the devastating effects of this year’s Red Tide bloom. The impact was immediate and also coincides with the slowest time of the island tourist season. It resulted in abrupt income loss for many business owners.

 

Anna Maria Island Fundraiser

Jack Elka Photography

 

Sponsors of this event were many local restaurants like the SandBar, Anna Maria Oyster Bar, Blue Marlin, Dry Dock Grill, Seafood Shack and The Waterfront Restaurant. Others included Visit Florida, Bradenton Area and Convention Bureau, Darwin Brewing, Southern Glazers Wine and Spirits, Gold Coast Eagle Distributing and the Bradenton Herald.

Darcie Duncan, owner and broker of Duncan Real Estate, participated in the festivities. Pictured below are Carol Whitmore, (Manatee County Commissioner, left), Darcie Duncan (middle) and John Horne (owner of Anna Maria Oyster Bar, right).

 

If you like to get the latest information on the beach conditions please contact Team Duncan. We aim to provide our guests and customers with the most accurate information about the daily situation. Please call us at 941 779 0304 or send us a quick message here.

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Red Tide in the Gulf of Mexico

If you have been to the Florida Gulf coast you have heard of Red Tide. The harmful algal bloom is the rapid growth of microscopic algae. It generally occurs in late summer or early fall. Along the Gulf coast of Florida and Texas, the algae species Karenia brevis produces toxins that have harmful effects on people, fish, marine mammals and birds. It can result in large fish kills and discolored water. These brevetoxins can become airborne when wave action breaks the cells and can cause severe respiratory irritation in people.

Luckily, Anna Maria Island has not seen severe outbreaks on a yearly basis. Oftentimes the blooms occur in the South Western Gulf of Mexico and don’t travel all the way into our region.

The latest update from Sep 27, 2018 according to the Mote Marine report shows the welcome improvement of the situation on Anna Maria Island. Locals and visitors are enjoying the beaches again!

Research of Red Tide

Biologists have documented the occurrence and abundance of K. brevis for more than 50 years, during which detection and monitoring technologies have changed dramatically. The local Mote Marine Laboratory and Aquarium in Sarasota is involved in the Red Tide research program.

Prior to 1970s Florida red tides were believed to originate inshore. Blooms and respiratory irritation were most often observed first around passes and barrier islands. It is now determined that red tides begin in nutrient-poor water 111 to 46 miles offshore. There are 4 stages of a bloom. First is accumulation and spreading into an area.  During the second stage growth occurs. The population steadily increases and within a few weeks, K. brevis concentrations may be high enough to kill fish. In the third stage wind and currents control the bloom’s movement. If the algae moves inshore, nutrient runoff from land may promote bloom expansion. A bloom can linger in coastal areas for days, weeks or even months. During the last stage wind and currents disperse the cells.  New water introduction reduces the concentration of K. brevis cells.

Status information

Scientists are now able to better forecast red tides and their movements. Besides water sampling and enumeration (cell counts), molecular tools and toxin analysis the detection with satellite imagery is a helpful tool. The collected data can be used in predictive models of bloom movement.

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) publishes reports on the current status of Karenia brevis blooms using tables, static maps, and interactive Google Earth maps. Please click on more information here. Mote’s Beach Conditions Reporting System provides shoreline observations for public beaches like Manatee County Beach and Coquina Beach on Anna Maria Island. The information is updated as often as twice daily at visitbeaches.org.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) also issues bulletins that contain an analysis of ocean color satellite imagery, field observations, models, public health reports and buoy data.

Manatee County is also updating daily at mymanatee.org/redtide.

Anna Maria Island Red Tide

 

Please contact Team Duncan for more information on this topic. Our office is open Monday through Saturday. We are looking forward to your call at 941 779 0304  or send us a quick message here.

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No trash on the beach please!


The most beautiful, white sandy beaches set Anna Maria Island apart from other island getaways. Let’s all keep it that way and work on our common goal of no trash on the beach!

Garbage in the oceans

Garbage Patch items

With more than 320 million metric tons of plastic produced every year a disturbing amount of it ends up in our oceans. The biggest accumulation is known as the Great Pacific Garbage Patch.  It appears more like open water in the areal view but it is like a massive swirling vortex with debris inside from all over the world. The patch has grown to twice the size of Texas. 92% are estimated to come from larger pieces but 1.7 trillion pieces are micro plastic. Many of it is eaten by marine animals, filling up their stomachs to the point of being fatal or becoming part of the food supply chain. Toxins are released into the water and pose a danger to all of us.

 

Trash on the beaches

Kamilo Beach, Hawaii

Kamilo Beach, Hawaii

The nightmare of turning a beautiful place into a nasty environmental disaster is Kamilo Beach on Hawaii. It is also known as “Junk Beach”.  A  formerly  lovely white sand beach is now a trap for countless tons of trash. Because of the Pacific currents ocean garbage accumulates in massive proportions.

In organized Florida beach clean ups cigarette butts are the most common type of garbage found.  Considering that it takes more than 10 years for a cigarette to decompose leaving butts behind is just not right. The beach is not a big ashtray. Also, smoking exposes others to second hand smoke and deprives them to enjoy the fresh salty air.

 

 

Other top ten objects collected are solely plastic items. The list contains bags, cups, lids, food containers, food wrappers, toys and plastic straws. Again, coastal animals can mistake small plastic items for food. And who wants to sit on the beach surrounded by unsightly plastic items.

The SandBar Restaurant on the North end of the island and its sister restaurants BeachHouse and Marvista switched to more eco-friendly paper straws last year to make a little difference.

On Anna Maria Island, every beach access has garbage containers to dispose of trash appropriately. There is really is no reason to bring items to the beach and leave them behind.

Volunteer Opportunities

There are several ways to contribute to keep our beaches clean. The mission of the nonprofit organization “Keep Manatee Beautiful” is to bring together volunteers, businesses and local governments to provide grassroots solutions to littering, illegal dumping, solid waste disposal, recycling and beautification. They organize regular clean ups. The next event is scheduled Oct 6th, 2018. It is the International Coastal Clean Up sponsored by the Ocean Conservancy.

The Anna Maria Island Turtle Watch and Bird Monitoring group helps to keep the beach habitat clean for wildlife and people alike. The volunteers walk the beach every morning during turtle season and collect trash once the nest activity has been recorded. Especially plastic bags pose a danger to the turtles as they mistake them for their favorite food source –  jellyfish.

Turtle Watch clean up

The Sarasota Bay Watch conducts an annual Sister Keys Clean Up. During this year’s effort 80 volunteers worked for four hours on the island and around the mangrove fringes to collect 1,300 pounds of trash and 80 recyclable items.

If you like to learn more about Anna Maria Island’s community efforts contact one of our Team Duncan members. We are former and current Turtle Watch members, life long island residents and beach lovers.

Please contact us at 941 779 0304 or send us a a quick message here.

 

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Less active Hurricane Season 2018

An updated forecast by the Colorado State University calls for a less active hurricane season 2018. The yearly storm season in the Atlantic basin runs from June 1 to Nov 30. The weather pattern changes from the drier months in the beginning of the year to the typical summer weather. On Anna Maria Island, you can see the thunderstorm clouds pushing from the East coast towards the West in the afternoon.

On the average the U.S. mainland sees about one to two landfalls each season. For example, last year hurricane Irma was a monster storm that hit Florida and caused severe damage to the historic Anna Maria Island City Pier.

Naming hurricanes

The yearly forecast estimates how many named storms are expected. When a tropical depression displays a rotating circulation pattern and reaches a wind speed 39 miles per hour it will become a tropical storm and gets a name. These names are based on a strict procedure established by the World Meteorological Organization. For Atlantic hurricanes, there is a list of male and female names which are used on a six-year rotation. If a major storm occurred that caused severe damage the name will be stricken from the list and replaced.

Most destructive storms

A hurricane is formed when wind speeds reach 74 mph. The Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale classifies the storms into 5 categories. The ratings from 1 to 5 estimates potential property damage. Hurricanes reaching Category 3 and higher are considered major hurricanes because of their potential for significant loss of life and damage. Category 5 storms exceed 156 mph maximum sustained winds. The extremely destructive and deadly Hurricane Katrina was a Category 5 storm at one point. It caused catastrophic damage along the Gulf coast from central Florida to Texas due the storm surge and levee failure. The strongest Atlantic hurricanes  on record is Allen in 1980 with winds at 190 mph. There were only 3 hurricanes at Category 5 to hit the U.S.: Andrew in 1992, Camille in 1969 and an unnamed storm in 1935.

The original storm forecast for 2018 called for 14 total named storms with 6 hurricanes and 2 major hurricanes. The updated outlook estimates a significant reduction to 11 total named storms, 4 hurricanes and 1 major hurricane. This includes Alberto, a subtropical storm that occurred in May and before the actual hurricane season. Several reasons are given for these lower numbers.

Why less storms in 2018?

There are several factors coming into play for a reduced chance of hurricanes for this year.

Firstly, the Atlantic Ocean temperature pattern features cooler than average sea-surface temperatures that expanded in the eastern Atlantic and in the central northern Atlantic. This anomaly when occurring in June seems to represent more inactive hurricane seasons. The water temperatures between the Lesser Antilles and Africa are supportive for tropical growth nearly year-round. The warmer the water is in that region the more likely a tropical storm will develop. If the cooler than average trend persists and continues into the more active months of August, September and October less tropical activity east of the Caribbean can be expected. Subtropical Storm Alberto was able to develop before the start of the official storm season in the relatively warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico. Since then the water temperature is cooler than average which diminishes the chances of storms to develop.

 

The weather phenomena El Niño in the Pacific ocean can also influence Atlantic conditions.  The current atmospheric component suggest a less active season than originally thought. Waters in the central and eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean have warmed above average and FEMA experts also noted an abnormally strong wind shear over the Caribbean Sea in June. This hurricane season is feeling the effects of a developing El Niño.

Lastly, the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) that defines the pattern of pressure gradients over the northern Atlantic Ocean is expected to remain positive through the next few months. The Azores-Bermuda high-pressure system and the Greenland low-pressure system are strengthened in this positive phase of the NAO. This creates a stronger pressure gradient and increased wind between the two systems and more wind around the Azores-Bermuda high. This means a quicker track for winter storms crossing the northern Atlantic. However, during hurricane season it brings less than favorable conditions for storm development with three components:

  • Gustier winds across much of the subtropics and North Atlantic
  • Cooler water temperature
  • A slightly faster tropical wave track across the Atlantic.

Only one larger storm can bring devastating damage but luckily Anna Maria Island has been very fortunate over the last 50+ years. We all hope that Irma was the exception. With all the indicators for a less than active hurricane season summer looks great! Enjoy the beach!

If you looking for the perfect island getaway contact the Duncan Real Estate vacation team at 941 779 0304 send us a quick message here.

 

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Summer hits Anna Maria Island!

With 90 plus degree weather the summer is in full swing on Anna Maria Island with locals and vacationers hitting the beach. Here are some beach tips so everybody stays safe and has a blast.

Beach flag warning system

Before swimming check out the beach flags on the county beaches on the island to learn about the water conditions. Florida has a uniform beach flag system that uses 4 colors to inform beachgoers. Life guards are monitoring the conditions throughout the day and will communicate with the firefighters in the two Manatee County firefighters that also display the flags.
Red – Swim with extreme caution due to strong currents or rough surf
Yellow – Swim with caution due to strong currents or rough surf
Green – Swimming allowed, calm conditions
Purple – Presence of marine pests such as jellyfish, sharks, stingrays or red tide

The Double Red flag indicates that the water closed to the public.

Also, don’t forget the “stingray shuffle” to avoid the unpleasant experience of getting stung by the sharp tail of a stingray. They tend to hide in the shallow water close to the waterline. If you shuffle the sand while entering they will quickly disappear.

 

Florida Sun

Don’t underestimate the UV rays even on a cloudier day. Florida’s sun is extremely strong and sunscreen is a must. Applying high SPF about 20 minutes before you go to the beach is best and don’t forget to reapply. Consider cover ups like hats and other UV protective gear and bring umbrellas or a sun tent. All our Duncan vacation rental guests enjoy a 10% discount at BeachBums, a local beach rental shop. Sun burns are extremely painful and can ruin the rest of the vacation. Also, stay hydrated when enjoying the beach. The heat is intense and can cause a heat stroke. It can occur if your body temperature rises to 104 F or higher for example by prolonged exposure to or physical exertion in high temperatures.

Lightning

The Tampa Bay area is referred to as the “Lightning Capital of the World”. If measured by the average number of days with thunderstorm activity it should be more accurately called the “Lightning Capital of North America”. The safest and most obvious place to be in a thunderstorm is indoors. Also, a car is good place to be because the lightning will travel around the surface of the vehicle and then go to ground. This occurs because the vehicle acts like a Faraday cage. The summer weather pattern pushes clouds from the East to the West and daily afternoon thunderstorms along the Gulf of Mexico coast are the norm. Be prepared and check the radar if you are planning any outdoor activities.

 

Beach Fishing

Did you know? Fishing directly off the beaches on Anna Maria Island requires a saltwater fishing license.  Try the app Fish/Hunt Florida to take care of your license application. The fee is $17 per year. If you like to safe the money and skip the license consider fishing off the piers on the island that are covered by a blanket license. Also, anyone under 16 or people eligible for food stamps, temporary cash assistance or medicaid are exempt. Florida residents over 65 don’t need a license either.  Another fun experience is coming up with Florida Lobster season by the end of July. Some of the critters make their way all the way up to this area but the Keys are the best known for their rock lobsters. There is a separate license for lobstering.

If you need any other information while on the island don’t hesitate to contact the Duncan Real Estate Rental team. Please call at 941 779 0304 or send us a quick message here.

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Private Beach on Anna Maria Island?

Florida Statute 163.035 deals with the beach rights of water front homeowners and will go into effect July 1st.  It has caused a lot of confusion for all Anna Maria Island residents and visitors that feared the island will have private beaches only.

The legislation states:

ORDINANCES AND RULES RELATING TO CUSTOMARY USE.
A governmental entity may not adopt or keep in effect an ordinance or rule
that finds, determines, relies on, or is based upon customary use of any
portion of a beach above the mean high-water line, as defined in s. 177.27,
unless such ordinance or rule is based on a judicial declaration affirming
recreational customary use on such beach.

What does this mean?

Traditionally, beachgoers walked, suntanned, fished and used the beach in front of island homes that was considered public under the customary use doctrine. Now, the beach becomes private above the mean high-water line. Cities and counties would have to go to court instead of simply passing an ordinance to designate a privately-owned beach as public under the “recreational customary use” doctrine.  Municipalities that decide to designate a private beach as public must adopt a notice at a public hearing stating their intention. Then a “Complaint for Declaration of Recreational Customary Use” needs to be filed with the circuit court in the county in which the beach is located within 60 days, providing notice to the property owner. The municipality has the burden of proving that a recreational customary use exists. For example, calling witnesses who have long used that beach, or producing historic photographs of public use.

Lines in the sand

In some communities the beach seaward of the mean high water line, sometimes called “wet sand,” is public. The beach landward of the line or “dry sand” is private and owned by the upland property owner.

However, the erosion control lines replace the mean high water lines on renourished beaches and supercede state legislation to the contrary.  “The statute is going to have a very limited application and impact given that most beaches are publicly held or subject to renourishment projects,” said Florida environmental attorney Patrick Krechowski. Where beach renourishment has taken place, the public has reasonable access to those beaches seaward of the erosion control line (ECL) according to Charlie Hunsicker, the Manatee County’s Director of Parks and Natural Resources. He is in charge of the local beach renourishment.

Gulf and Bay Beaches

ECL – Anna Maria Island

On Anna Maria Island in Manatee County,  the mean high water lines and erosion control lines are vastly different. The mean high water line is established using a 19-year average based on local tidal data established by tidal observations made at specific tide stations. The ECL along the Gulf side beach was established by engineers during state- and federally-funded beach renourishment projects. For most part of the island from the South to just about North of the Sandbar Restaurant the erosion control line runs along the dune vegetation line.  The new law will not effect this area of the island at all and will leave most of the beach open to the public.
Interestingly, the very North end of the island never had any beach renourishment and the width of the beach has changed naturally over the decades. About 10 years ago, the seawalls of several Gulf front homes were surrounded by the saltwater and some homes only had a sliver of sand in front of their homes.  Luckily, the sand came back and now the most beautiful wide beach stretches along the North end all the way to Bean Point or the tip of the island.

 

The beach on the bay side was always considered private with the understanding that people are allowed to stroll along the waterline. In order to determine the mean high water line along the bay side of the island the City of Anna Maria recently ordered a survey in the area of  the 600 block of South Bay Boulevard. The stakes reveal that the incoming tidal waters of Tampa Bay completely cover the dry sand of the beach. When walking this section of the bay side beachgoers have to walk in the water to avoid trespassing private land. A similar situation occurs in the area by the newly remodeled Rod ‘n Reel Pier. It has its private section of the beach robed off and people will most likely get wet toes to pass this area.

If you need a tip on the perfect spot to relax on the beach stop by our office on historic Pine Ave and chat with our knowledgeable staff. They know the island by heart and are happy to share their island secrets. Call us at 941 779 0304 or send us a quick message here.

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Turtle Season starts!

The official start of the Anna Maria Island Turtle Season was May 1st.  Loggerhead nests were already found on Captiva Island and Longboat Key. This indicates that Anna Maria Island will soon see its first nest as well. For over 30 years the volunteers of the Anna Maria Island Turtle Watch have made tremendous efforts to help our sea turtles. They are monitoring 12 miles of Manatee County shoreline. Each morning the beaches are walked and new nests are getting staked and observed for the next two months. After about 60 days the little hatchlings are making their way to the water during night time. Once the nest has hatched, it is getting inspected and shells are counted. Sometimes straggling hatchlings are left behind and get saved. So far, the Anna Maria Island Turtle Watch has protected 4454 nests, counted 301 694 turtle eggs and helped about 271,680 hatchlings.

You can show your support for the Anna Maria Island Turtle Watch by adopting a sea turtle nest laid on Anna Maria Island. A plaque of your choice will be placed for a $100 tax-deductible donation. There are also Turtle Talks organized which take place every Tuesday at 10 am at the CrossPointe Fellowship, 8605 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach. Stop by and experience a 35 min presentation which informs via video and photo displays, Q&A session and other interactivities.

There are a few simple rules all of us enjoying this island can follow to make it another successful turtle season this year. The mother turtles and the hatchlings are easily distracted by artificial lights that appear visible on the beach.  Unfortunately, disorientations happen every year.  If you encounter a nesting mother do not take flash pictures or disturb in any way. Loggerheads don’t have a “reverse gear”. For that reason, beach chairs or other items left behind on the beach can become deathly traps for the turtles. Also, sand digging is fun but fill in any holes after your beach day.

The turtle season runs until Oct. 31. and the 2018 hatchlings will return to this region once they reach maturity in about 20 years.

 

If you like more information about the Turtle Watch volunteers stop by at our office 310 Pine Avenue. Our team has some past and current members.

Are you looking for a beach front rental to be close to the natural display of nightly nesting activity? Call our rental team at 941 779 0304 to secure the best spot on our beautiful white beaches or send us a quick message here.

 

 

 

 

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The Silver Kings Are Back! Bring the Tarpons on

Anna Maria Island is home to one of the best fisheries in the world and tarpon play a major role in making this area a key destination for anglers. Tarpon are a large fish that usually weigh anywhere from 60-280 lbs. They are prized as one of the top sport fish to catch. Known for their acrobatic stunts and long runs when hooked, Tarpon are a migratory fish that make their run through the waters here during the months of May and June. These fish can be found off the beaches or in the passes on the North and South end of Anna Maria island. Tarpon can be targeted using live bait, thread fin herring on an incoming tide and crabs are best on a strong outgoing tide. Be aware that these fish can be spooked quite easily. Positioning your boat strategically can be a determining factor in catching one of these beasts. Circle hooks and a long leader line are essential when rigging your fishing rod. Whether you are an avid angler or this is your first-time fishing for tarpon, Anna Maria island is your one stop shop for these marvelous fish.

Here is a few recommendations on guides in the area, 941-447-1063 is Captain Carson & 941-812-5256 for Captain Colby Gregory. Need a place to put your boat? See below for a list of all of our vacation rental homes with canal access.

Duncan Real Estate Vacation Rentals

If you find that perfect canal vacation rental, give our rental team a call today at 941-779-0304 and we will get you all “hooked” up!

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The White Pelicans Are Back!

Ever see a white pelican during your stay on Anna Maria Island?

These birds more than likely travelled a farther distance than you to get to Anna Maria Island!  Their migratory journey started at the world’s largest biome known as the Boreal forest all the way to marshy wetlands on the Gulf of Mexico. This epic journey is made possible due to their long wingspan (up to 9ft) and the flock forms v-formation allowing them to conserve energy. Their feeding behavior is quite different than our local native brown pelican that dives for their food. The buoyant white pelican forages through a feeding strategy wherein a flock will form a circle or semi-circle and, using coordinated bill dipping and wing beating, drive prey toward shore where it is more easily caught. If you are vacationing with us during the winter months and want to see this rare hunting technique we suggest frequenting the protected bays around Anna Maria Island. Robison’s preserve and the Perico preserve are two other great areas where you can see this take place

White Pelicans

Contact us or call Duncan Real Estate today at 941-779-0304 to speak with our knowledgeable real estate specialists.